The hare, the tortoise and the crocodile: the ecology of angiosperm dominance, conifer persistence and fern filtering

@article{Coomes2005TheHT,
  title={The hare, the tortoise and the crocodile: the ecology of angiosperm dominance, conifer persistence and fern filtering},
  author={David Anthony Coomes and Robert B. Allen and Warren A. Bentley and Larry E. Burrows and Charles D. Canham and Laura L. Fagan and David M. Forsyth and Aurora Gaxiola‐Alcantar and R. L. Parfitt and Wendy A. Ruscoe and David A. Wardle and Deborah J. Wilson and Elaine Frances Wright},
  journal={Journal of Ecology},
  year={2005},
  volume={93}
}
1 Angiosperm trees often dominate forests growing in resource‐rich habitats, whereas conifers are generally restricted to less productive habitats. It has been suggested that conifers may be displaced by angiosperms except where competition is less intense, because conifer seedlings are inherently slow growing, and are outpaced by faster‐growing angiosperm species. Here we investigate whether competition with ferns and deeply shading trees also contributes to a failure of conifers to regenerate… 

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