Corpus ID: 14599682

The growth and adaptive capabilities of the hoof wall and sole: functional changes in response to stress.

@inproceedings{Bowker2003TheGA,
  title={The growth and adaptive capabilities of the hoof wall and sole: functional changes in response to stress.},
  author={Robert M. Bowker},
  year={2003}
}
1. Introduction The hoof wall represents the outer protective structure of the foot and has long been of interest in terms of its growth, structure, and functioning, especially during disease conditions such as laminitis. The incidence of problems related to the hoof wall has been estimated to be 30% or more [1,2]. Although causal factors of some hoof wall abnormalities are obvious, such as direct trauma to the hoof wall and/or grain overload during laminitis, other problems and some forms of… Expand
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This work provides the first concrete link between mechanical behavior and laminar morphology, supporting the link between stresses and remodeling of Primary epidermal laminae (PEL). Expand
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Results of this study signify the capability of PEL to remodel in response to applied stress to the regions of the hoof, and add to the circumstantial evidence supporting the hypothesis of adaptive remodelling in the laminar junction. Expand
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OBJECTIVE To quantify changes in hoof wall strain distribution associated with exercise and time in Standardbreds. ANIMALS 18 young adult Standardbreds. PROCEDURES 9 horses were exercised 4 d/wkExpand
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Significant regional differences in density were found in the toe, lateral and medial walls of horses' hooves, a first study of regional differences of tubular densities. Expand
Equine hoof wall tubule density and morphology
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Significant regional differences in density were found in the toe, lateral and medial walls of horses' hooves, a first study of regional differences of tubular densities. Expand
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