The great Atlantic Sargassum belt

@article{Wang2019TheGA,
  title={The great Atlantic Sargassum belt},
  author={Mengqiu Wang and Chuanmin Hu and Brian B. Barnes and Gary T. Mitchum and Brian E. Lapointe and Joseph P. Montoya},
  journal={Science},
  year={2019},
  volume={365},
  pages={83 - 87}
}
The biggest bloom Floating mats of Sargassum seaweed in the center of the North Atlantic were first reported by Christopher Columbus in the 15th century. These mats, although abundant, have until recently been limited and discontinuous. However, Wang et al. report that, since 2011, the mats have increased in density and aerial extent to generate a 8850-kilometer-long belt that extends from West Africa to the Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico (see the Perspective by Gower and King). This… 
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Report that patches and lines of these seaweeds have grown and spread through the Caribbean and across the north equatorial Atlantic to the west coast of Africa and the Gulf of Guinea, forming what the authors call the great Atlantic Sargassum belt.
The Impact of Sargassum Inundations on the Turks and Caicos Islands
Since 2011, holopelagic Sargassum fluitans and natans have been arriving en masse to the wider Caribbean region and West Africa, impacting near-shore habitats and coastal communities. We examined the
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