The global health burden of infection‐associated cancers in the year 2002

@article{Parkin2006TheGH,
  title={The global health burden of infection‐associated cancers in the year 2002},
  author={Donald Maxwell Parkin},
  journal={International Journal of Cancer},
  year={2006},
  volume={118}
}
  • D. Parkin
  • Published 2006
  • Medicine
  • International Journal of Cancer
Several infectious agents are considered to be causes of cancer in humans. [...] Key Result There would be 26.3% fewer cancers in developing countries (1.5 million cases per year) and 7.7% in developed countries (390,000 cases) if these infectious diseases were prevented. The attributable fraction at the specific sites varies from 100% of cervix cancers attributable to the papilloma viruses to a tiny proportion (0.4%) of liver cancers (worldwide) caused by liver flukes.Expand

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