The glass cliff: when and why women are selected as leaders in crisis contexts.

@article{Bruckmller2010TheGC,
  title={The glass cliff: when and why women are selected as leaders in crisis contexts.},
  author={Susanne Bruckm{\"u}ller and Nyla R. Branscombe},
  journal={The British journal of social psychology},
  year={2010},
  volume={49 Pt 3},
  pages={
          433-51
        }
}
The glass cliff refers to women being more likely to rise to positions of organizational leadership in times of crisis than in times of success, and men being more likely to achieve those positions in prosperous times. We examine the role that (a) a gendered history of leadership and (b) stereotypes about gender and leadership play in creating the glass cliff. In Expt 1, participants who read about a company with a male history of leadership selected a male future leader for a successful… 

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