The giant mycoheterotrophic orchid Erythrorchis altissima is associated mainly with a divergent set of wood-decaying fungi.

@article{OguraTsujita2018TheGM,
  title={The giant mycoheterotrophic orchid Erythrorchis altissima is associated mainly with a divergent set of wood-decaying fungi.},
  author={Yuki Ogura-Tsujita and Gerhard Gebauer and Hui Xu and Yu Fukasawa and Hidetaka Umata and Kenshi Tetsuka and Miho Kubota and Julienne M-I Schweiger and Satoshi Yamashita and Nitaro Maekawa and Masayuki Maki and Shiro Isshiki and Tomohisa Yukawa},
  journal={Molecular ecology},
  year={2018},
  volume={27 5},
  pages={
          1324-1337
        }
}
The climbing orchid Erythrorchis altissima is the largest mycoheterotroph in the world. Although previous in vitro work suggests that E. altissima has a unique symbiosis with wood-decaying fungi, little is known about how this giant orchid meets its carbon and nutrient demands exclusively via mycorrhizal fungi. In this study, the mycorrhizal fungi of E. altissima were molecularly identified using root samples from 26 individuals. Furthermore, in vitro symbiotic germination with five fungi and… Expand
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