The geomorphology, color, and thermal properties of Ryugu: Implications for parent-body processes

@article{Sugita2019TheGC,
  title={The geomorphology, color, and thermal properties of Ryugu: Implications for parent-body processes},
  author={Seiji Sugita and R. Honda and Tomokatsu Morota and S. Kameda and H. Sawada and Eri Tatsumi and Manabu Yamada and Chikatoshi Honda and Y. Yokota and Toru Kouyama and Naoya Sakatani and K. Ogawa and H. Suzuki and T. Okada and N. Namiki and S. Tanaka and Yasuo Iijima and K. Yoshioka and M. Hayakawa and Y. Cho and M. Matsuoka and N. Hirata and N. Hirata and H. Miyamoto and Deborah Domingue and M. Hirabayashi and T. Nakamura and T. Hiroi and Tatsuhiro Michikami and P. Michel and R.‐L. Ballouz and Olivier S. Barnouin and C. M. Ernst and S. E. Schr{\"o}der and H. Kikuchi and R. Hemmi and Goro Komatsu and Tetsuya Fukuhara and M. Taguchi and Takehiko Arai and Hiroki Senshu and Hirohide Demura and Yoshiko Ogawa and Yuri Shimaki and T. Sekiguchi and Thomas G. M{\"u}ller and Axel Hagermann and T. Mizuno and H. Noda and K. Matsumoto and R. Yamada and Y. Ishihara and H. Ikeda and H. Araki and K. Yamamoto and Sato Abe and F. Yoshida and A. Higuchi and S. Sasaki and Shoko Oshigami and Shigeru Tsuruta and Kori Asari and Seiichi Tazawa and M. Shizugami and J. Kimura and T. Otsubo and H. Yabuta and S. Hasegawa and M. Ishiguro and S. Tachibana and Eric Edward Palmer and Robert Gaskell and Lucille Le Corre and Ralf Jaumann and K. Otto and Nicole Schmitz and P. A. Abell and M. A. Barucci and M. E. Zolensky and Faith Vilas and Florian Thuillet and C. Sugimoto and N. Takaki and Y. Suzuki and H. Kamiyoshihara and M. Okada and K. Nagata and M. Fujimoto and M. Yoshikawa and Y. Yamamoto and K. Shirai and Rina Noguchi and Naoko Ogawa and Fuyuto Terui and S. Kikuchi and Toshiko Yamaguchi and Y. Oki and Y. Takao and Hiroshi Takeuchi and G. Ono and Yuya Mimasu and K. Yoshikawa and T. Takahashi and Y. Takei and Atsushi Fujii and C. Hirose and Satoru Nakazawa and S. Hosoda and Osamu Mori and T. Shimada and Stefania Soldini and T. Iwata and M. Abe and H. Yano and Ryudo Tsukizaki and M. Ozaki and K. Nishiyama and T. Saiki and S. Watanabe and Y. Tsuda},
  journal={Science},
  year={2019},
  volume={364}
}
Hayabusa2 at the asteroid Ryugu Asteroids fall to Earth in the form of meteorites, but these provide little information about their origins. The Japanese mission Hayabusa2 is designed to collect samples directly from the surface of an asteroid and return them to Earth for laboratory analysis. Three papers in this issue describe the Hayabusa2 team's study of the near-Earth carbonaceous asteroid 162173 Ryugu, at which the spacecraft arrived in June 2018 (see the Perspective by Wurm). Watanabe et… 

The surface composition of asteroid 162173 Ryugu from Hayabusa2 near-infrared spectroscopy

TLDR
The Hayabusa2 team's study of the near-Earth carbonaceous asteroid 162173 Ryugu, at which the spacecraft arrived in June 2018, describes Ryugu's geological features and surface colors and combined results from all three papers to constrain the asteroid's formation process.

Hayabusa2 arrives at the carbonaceous asteroid 162173 Ryugu—A spinning top–shaped rubble pile

TLDR
The Hayabusa2 spacecraft measured the mass, size, shape, density, and spin rate of asteroid Ryugu, showing that it is a porous rubble pile, and observations of Ryugu's shape, mass, and geomorphology suggest that Ryugu was reshaped by centrifugally induced deformation during a period of rapid rotation.

Pebbles and sand on asteroid (162173) Ryugu: In situ observation and particles returned to Earth

The Hayabusa2 spacecraft investigated the C-type (carbonaceous) asteroid (162173) Ryugu. The mission performed two landing operations to collect samples of surface and subsurface material, the latter

Sample collection from asteroid (162173) Ryugu by Hayabusa2: Implications for surface evolution

TLDR
The authors conclude that the asteroid experienced a prior period of strong solar heating caused by changes in its orbit, and suggest that Ryugu previously experienced an orbital excursion near the Sun.

Images from the surface of asteroid Ryugu show rocks similar to carbonaceous chondrite meteorites

TLDR
Images from the Mobile Asteroid Surface Scout lander show that rocks on asteroid Ryugu are similar to carbonaceous chondrite meteorites, and close-up images of a rock reveal a dark matrix with small, bright, spectrally different inclusions, implying that it did not experience extensive aqueous alteration.

Thermally altered subsurface material of asteroid (162173) Ryugu

Analyses of meteorites and theoretical models indicate that some carbonaceous near-Earth asteroids may have been thermally altered due to radiative heating during close approaches to the Sun 1 – 3 .

Preliminary analysis of the Hayabusa2 samples returned from C-type asteroid Ryugu

C-type asteroids1 are considered to be primitive small Solar System bodies enriched in water and organics, providing clues to the origin and evolution of the Solar System and the building blocks of

On the origin and evolution of the asteroid Ryugu: A comprehensive geochemical perspective.

Presented here are the observations and interpretations from a comprehensive analysis of 16 representative particles returned from the C-type asteroid Ryugu by the Hayabusa2 mission. On average Ryugu

Thermography of Asteroid and Future Applications in Space Missions

  • T. Okada
  • Physics, Geology
    Applied Sciences
  • 2020
The Near-Earth Asteroid 162173 Ryugu is a C-type asteroid which preserves information about the ancient Solar System and is considered enriched in volatiles such as water and organics associated with
...

References

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The surface composition of asteroid 162173 Ryugu from Hayabusa2 near-infrared spectroscopy

TLDR
The Hayabusa2 team's study of the near-Earth carbonaceous asteroid 162173 Ryugu, at which the spacecraft arrived in June 2018, describes Ryugu's geological features and surface colors and combined results from all three papers to constrain the asteroid's formation process.

Hayabusa2 arrives at the carbonaceous asteroid 162173 Ryugu—A spinning top–shaped rubble pile

TLDR
The Hayabusa2 spacecraft measured the mass, size, shape, density, and spin rate of asteroid Ryugu, showing that it is a porous rubble pile, and observations of Ryugu's shape, mass, and geomorphology suggest that Ryugu was reshaped by centrifugally induced deformation during a period of rapid rotation.

Compositional study of asteroids in the Erigone collisional family using visible spectroscopy at the 10.4 m GTC

Two primitive near Earth asteroids, (101955) Bennu and (162173) Ryugu, will be visited by a spacecraft with the aim of returning samples back to Earth. Since these objects are believed to originate

PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF METEORITES AND INTERPLANETARY DUST PARTICLES: CLUES TO THE PROPERTIES OF THE METEORS AND THEIR PARENT BODIES

Abstract.Meteorites, generally 1 cm or larger in size that are believed to sample asteroids, and interplanetary dust particles (IDPs), generally 5–50 μm in size that are believed to sample both

Boulders on asteroid Toutatis as observed by Chang’e-2

TLDR
Using images acquired by the Chang’e-2 spacecraft, more than 200 boulders have been identified over the imaged area of the near-Earth asteroid Toutatis and the cumulative boulder size frequency distribution shows a steep slope, which may imply a different preservation state or diverse formation scenarios.

Interplanetary Dust Particles as Samples of Icy Asteroids

Meteorites have long been considered as reflections of the compositional diversity of main belt asteroids and consequently they have been used to decipher their origin, formation, and evolution.

Spectral and rotational properties of near-Earth asteroid (162173) Ryugu, target of the Hayabusa2 sample return mission

Context. The JAXA Hayabusa2 mission will perform the first ever sample return from a primitive asteroid. The target near-Earth asteroid (162173) Ryugu will be reached in mid-2018 and its samples will

Thermal fatigue as the origin of regolith on small asteroids

TLDR
It is reported that thermal fatigue, a mechanism of rock weathering and fragmentation with no subsequent ejection, is the dominant process governing regolith generation on small asteroids and that thermal fragmentation induced by the diurnal temperature variations breaks up rocks larger than a few centimetres more quickly than do micrometeoroid impacts.
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