The genus Cervus in eastern Eurasia

@article{Groves2005TheGC,
  title={The genus Cervus in eastern Eurasia},
  author={Colin P. Groves},
  journal={European Journal of Wildlife Research},
  year={2005},
  volume={52},
  pages={14-22}
}
  • C. Groves
  • Published 1 March 2006
  • Biology
  • European Journal of Wildlife Research
In 2004, Christian Pitra and co-workers published the first molecular phylogeny of Old World deer which advanced our understanding of the Cervinae immeasurably by demonstrating the non-monophyletic status of the red deer/wapiti group, the chital/hog deer group and the swamp deer/Eld's deer group. Therefore, many conspicuous external features—antler complexity, mane and rump-patch development—turned out to be related not to phylogeny as much as to climatic-related lifestyle factors. At a lower… 
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TLDR
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References

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Phylogenetic Relationships of Cervinae Based on Sequence of Mitochondrial Cytochrome b Gene
TLDR
A close genetic relationship between Elaphurus and Cervus indicated that two taxa should be incorporated into the same genus, whereas the classification status of Dama dama still remained uncertain.
Morphometrical relationships between South-east Asian deer (Cervidae, tribe Cervini): evolutionary and biogeographic implications
TLDR
The results suggest that elements of skull shape as determined by morphometrics can be used as phylogenetic characters and depict phylogenetic relationships among Cervini deer species that is not far removed from the picture given by molecular studies and other characters.
A phylogenetic comparison of red deer and wapiti using mitochondrial DNA.
TLDR
Using parsimony and distance analysis, red deer and wapiti are derived from a single recent common ancestor, which is consistent with current taxonomy that recognizes the subspecies of Cervus elaphus as monophyletic group.
Phylogeography and conservation genetics of Eld's deer (Cervus eldi)
TLDR
Based on significant genetic differentiation among Eld's deer subspecies, it is recommended the continued management of this species in three distinct evolutionarily significant units (ESUs) and where possible, it may be advisable to translocate individuals between isolated populations within a subspecies to maintain levels of genetic variation in remaining Eld's Deer populations.
A mitochondrial DNA control region phylogeny of the Cervinae: speciation in Cervus and implications for conservation
TLDR
Sequences from complete mitochondrial control regions (mtDNA CR) were used to infer phylogenetic relationships in 25 Cervinae taxa, finding sequence variability at the mtDNA CR is informative for defining species and subspecies boundaries, and for locating the geographical origin of captive‐reared stocks.
Two genetically distinct lineages of the sika deer, Cervus nippon, in Japanese islands: comparison of mitochondrial D-loop region sequences.
TLDR
Based on genetic diversity among populations of the sika deer, Cervus nippon, nucleotide sequences of the mitochondrial D-loop regions were determined in animals from 13 localities in the Japanese islands, providing an invaluable insight into better understanding the evolutionary history, phylogeny, taxonomy, and population genetics of this deer.
A mitochondrial control region and cytochrome b phylogeny of sika deer (Cervus nippon) and report of tandem repeats in the control region.
TLDR
Phylogenetic trees constructed using sequences of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene clearly demonstrated that sika are monophyletic with respect to C. elaphus.
Bottlenecks, drift and differentiation: the population structure and demographic history of sika deer (Cervus nippon) in the Japanese archipelago
TLDR
The results do not support morphological subspecies designations, but are consistent with previous mitochondrial DNA analyses which suggest the existence of two genetically distinct lineages of sika deer in Japan.
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