The genome of the seagrass Zostera marina reveals angiosperm adaptation to the sea

@article{Olsen2016TheGO,
  title={The genome of the seagrass Zostera marina reveals angiosperm adaptation to the sea},
  author={Jeanine L. Olsen and Pierre Rouz{\'e} and Bram Verhelst and Yao-Cheng Lin and Till Bayer and Jonas Coll{\'e}n and Emanuela Dattolo and Emanuele De Paoli and Simon M. Dittami and Florian Maumus and Gurvan Michel and Anna R. Kersting and Chiara Lauritano and Rolf Lohaus and Mats T{\"o}pel and Thierry Tonon and Kevin Vanneste and Mojgan Amirebrahimi and J. H. van Brakel and Christoffer Bostr{\"o}m and Mansi Chovatia and Jane Grimwood and Jerry W Jenkins and Alexander Jueterbock and Amy Mraz and Wytze T. Stam and Hope N. Tice and Erich Bornberg-Bauer and Pamela J. Green and Gareth A Pearson and Gabriele Procaccini and Carlos M. Duarte and Jeremy Schmutz and Thorsten B. H. Reusch and Yves Van de Peer},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2016},
  volume={530},
  pages={331-335}
}
Seagrasses colonized the sea on at least three independent occasions to form the basis of one of the most productive and widespread coastal ecosystems on the planet. Here we report the genome of Zostera marina (L.), the first, to our knowledge, marine angiosperm to be fully sequenced. This reveals unique insights into the genomic losses and gains involved in achieving the structural and physiological adaptations required for its marine lifestyle, arguably the most severe habitat shift ever… Expand
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