The genetics of inbreeding depression

@article{Charlesworth2009TheGO,
  title={The genetics of inbreeding depression},
  author={Deborah Charlesworth and John H. Willis},
  journal={Nature Reviews Genetics},
  year={2009},
  volume={10},
  pages={783-796}
}
Inbreeding depression — the reduced survival and fertility of offspring of related individuals — occurs in wild animal and plant populations as well as in humans, indicating that genetic variation in fitness traits exists in natural populations. Inbreeding depression is important in the evolution of outcrossing mating systems and, because intercrossing inbred strains improves yield (heterosis), which is important in crop breeding, the genetic basis of these effects has been debated since the… 
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TLDR
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TLDR
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