The genetic history of Ice Age Europe

@article{Fu2016TheGH,
  title={The genetic history of Ice Age Europe},
  author={Qiaomei Fu and Cosimo Posth and Mateja Hajdinjak and Martin Petr and Swapan Mallick and Daniel M. Fernandes and Anja Furtw{\"a}ngler and Wolfgang Haak and Matthias Meyer and Alissa Mittnik and Birgit Nickel and Alexander Peltzer and Nadin Rohland and Viviane Slon and Sahra Talamo and Iosif Lazaridis and Mark Lipson and Iain Mathieson and Stephan Schiffels and Pontus Skoglund and Anatoly P. Derevianko and Nikolai Drozdov and V. Slavinsky and A. A. Tsybankov and Renata Grifoni Cremonesi and Francesco Mallegni and Bernard G{\'e}ly and Eligio Vacca and Manuel R. Gonz{\'a}lez Morales and Lawrence Guy Straus and Christine Neugebauer-Maresch and Maria Teschler-Nicola and Silviu Constantin and Oana Teodora Moldovan and Stefano Benazzi and Marco Peresani and Donato Coppola and Martina Lari and Stefano Ricci and Annamaria Ronchitelli and Fr{\'e}d{\'e}rique Valentin and Corinne Thevenet and Kurt Wehrberger and Dan Alexandru Grigorescu and H{\'e}l{\`e}ne Rougier and Isabelle Crevecoeur and Damien Flas and Patrick Semal and Marcello A. Mannino and Christophe Cupillard and Herv{\'e} Bocherens and Nicholas J. Conard and Katerina Harvati and Vyacheslav Moiseyev and Doroth{\'e}e G. Drucker and Jiř{\'i} Svoboda and Mike Richards and David Caramelli and Ron Pinhasi and Janet Kelso and Nick J. Patterson and Johannes Krause and Svante P{\"a}{\"a}bo and David Reich},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2016},
  volume={534},
  pages={200 - 205}
}
Modern humans arrived in Europe ~45,000 years ago, but little is known about their genetic composition before the start of farming ~8,500 years ago. [] Key Method Here we analyse genome-wide data from 51 Eurasians from ~45,000-7,000 years ago. Over this time, the proportion of Neanderthal DNA decreased from 3-6% to around 2%, consistent with natural selection against Neanderthal variants in modern humans. Whereas there is no evidence of the earliest modern humans in Europe contributing to the genetic…
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It is shown that the Dzudzuana population contributed the majority of the ancestry of post-Ice Age people in the Near East, North Africa, and even parts of Europe, thereby becoming the largest single contributor of ancestry of all present-day West Eurasians.
The evolutionary history of human populations in Europe.
Ancient Fennoscandian genomes reveal origin and spread of Siberian ancestry in Europe
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