The genetic basis of traits regulating sperm competition and polyandry: can selection favour the evolution of good- and sexy-sperm?

@article{Evans2007TheGB,
  title={The genetic basis of traits regulating sperm competition and polyandry: can selection favour the evolution of good- and sexy-sperm?},
  author={Jonathan P. Evans and Leigh W. Simmons},
  journal={Genetica},
  year={2007},
  volume={134},
  pages={5-19}
}
The good-sperm and sexy-sperm (GS-SS) hypotheses predict that female multiple mating (polyandry) can fuel sexual selection for heritable male traits that promote success in sperm competition. A major prediction generated by these models, therefore, is that polyandry will benefit females indirectly via their sons’ enhanced fertilization success. Furthermore, like classic ‘good genes’ and ‘sexy son’ models for the evolution of female preferences, GS-SS processes predict a genetic correlation… 

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Evolution of female multiple mating: A quantitative model of the “sexually selected sperm” hypothesis

  • G. BocediJ. Reid
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  • 2015
Explaining the evolution and maintenance of polyandry remains a key challenge in evolutionary ecology. One appealing explanation is the sexually selected sperm (SSS) hypothesis, which proposes that
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