The genetic basis of tail-loss evolution in humans and apes

@article{Xia2021TheGB,
  title={The genetic basis of tail-loss evolution in humans and apes},
  author={Bo Xia and Wei-Meng Zhang and Aleksandra Wudzinska and Emily Huang and Ran Brosh and Maayan Pour and Alexander Miller and Jeremy S. Dasen and Matthew T. Maurano and Sang Y. Kim and Jef D. Boeke and Itai Yanai},
  journal={bioRxiv},
  year={2021}
}
The loss of the tail is one of the main anatomical evolutionary changes to have occurred along the lineage leading to humans and to the “anthropomorphous apes”1,2. This morphological reprogramming in the ancestral hominoids has been long considered to have accommodated a characteristic style of locomotion and contributed to the evolution of bipedalism in humans3–5. Yet, the precise genetic mechanism that facilitated tail-loss evolution in hominoids remains unknown. Primate genome sequencing… 
3 Citations
Transposable Elements: Major Players in Shaping Genomic and Evolutionary Patterns
TLDR
The ‘double life' of TEs is described, being both ‘parasites’ and ‘symbionts’ of the genome, and it is argued that the transposition ofTEs contributes to two important evolutionary processes: the temporal dynamic of evolution and the induction of genetic variability.

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