The genetic basis of Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome

@article{Paschou2013TheGB,
  title={The genetic basis of Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome},
  author={Peristera Paschou},
  journal={Neuroscience \& Biobehavioral Reviews},
  year={2013},
  volume={37},
  pages={1026-1039}
}
  • P. Paschou
  • Published 1 July 2013
  • Biology
  • Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews

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References

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TLDR
The co-occurrence of GTS, SMS and their common behavioural/neuropsychiatric abnormalities should warrant further genetic investigation of chromosome 17p11.2 deletion site as it may be a promising region for containing a gene(s) of aetiological importance in the development of the GTS phenotype.
Indications of linkage and association of Gilles de la Tourette syndrome in two independent family samples: 17q25 is a putative susceptibility region.
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TLDR
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TLDR
A clinical sample of over 1,000 patients with TS and their family members was screened for SLITRK1 var321 to determine a more accurate estimate of the prevalence of this variant in the white TS clinic population and to test for any association between var321 and TS.
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Gilles de la Tourette syndrome is not linked to D2-dopamine receptor.
TLDR
A genetic linkage map of the region of DRD2 on the long arm of chromosome 11 and restriction fragment length polymorphism data from a total of four markers allowed us to exclude a Gilles de la Tourette syndrome susceptibility locus from a larger genetic region.
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