The generic/nongeneric distinction influences how children interpret new information about social others.

@article{Cimpian2011TheGD,
  title={The generic/nongeneric distinction influences how children interpret new information about social others.},
  author={Andrei Cimpian and Ellen M. Markman},
  journal={Child development},
  year={2011},
  volume={82 2},
  pages={471-92}
}
These studies investigate how the distinction between generic sentences (e.g., "Boys are good at math") and nongeneric sentences (e.g., "Johnny is good at math") shapes children's social cognition. These sentence types are hypothesized to have different implications about the source and nature of the properties conveyed. Specifically, generics may be more… CONTINUE READING