The future of fMRI and genetics research

@article{MeyerLindenberg2012TheFO,
  title={The future of fMRI and genetics research},
  author={Andreas Meyer-Lindenberg},
  journal={NeuroImage},
  year={2012},
  volume={62},
  pages={1286-1292}
}
Mapping the Schizophrenia Genes by Neuroimaging: The Opportunities and the Challenges
  • A. Arslan
  • Biology, Medicine
    International journal of molecular sciences
  • 2018
Schizophrenia (SZ) is a heritable brain disease originating from a complex interaction of genetic and environmental factors. The genes underpinning the neurobiology of SZ are largely unknown but
Strategies for integrated analysis in imaging genetics studies
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Associations between brain abnormalities and common genetic variants for schizophrenia: a narrative review of structural and functional neuroimaging findings.
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Behavior genetics: Past, present, future
TLDR
Behavior genetics has made significant contributions to developmental psychopathology by documenting the interplay among risk and protective factors at multiple levels of the organism, by clarifying the causal status of risk exposures, and by identifying factors that account for change and stability in psychopathology.
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