The fusiform face area is selective for faces not animals.

@article{Kanwisher1999TheFF,
  title={The fusiform face area is selective for faces not animals.},
  author={Nancy Kanwisher and David B. Stanley and Amy M. Harris},
  journal={Neuroreport},
  year={1999},
  volume={10 1},
  pages={
          183-7
        }
}
To test whether the human fusiform face area (FFA) responds not only to faces but to anything human or animate, we used fMRI to measure the response of the FFA to six new stimulus categories. The strongest responses were to stimuli containing faces: human faces (2.0% signal increase from fixation baseline) and human heads (1.7%), with weaker but still strong responses to whole humans (1.5%) and animal heads (1.3%). Responses to whole animals (1.0%) and human bodies without heads (1.0%) were… CONTINUE READING

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Current issues in prosopagnosia

  • E. DeRenzi
  • Aspects of Face Processing. Dordrecht: Martinus…
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