The funds, friends, and faith of happy people.

@article{Myers2000TheFF,
  title={The funds, friends, and faith of happy people.},
  author={David Gershom Myers},
  journal={The American psychologist},
  year={2000},
  volume={55 1},
  pages={
          56-67
        }
}
  • D. Myers
  • Published 2000
  • Medicine
  • The American psychologist
New studies are revealing predictors of subjective well-being, often assessed as self-reported happiness and life satisfaction. Worldwide, most people report being at least moderately happy, regardless of age and gender. As part of their scientific pursuit of happiness, researchers have examined possible associations between happiness and (a) economic growth and personal income, (b) close relationships, and (c) religious faith. 

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