The functions of stotting in Thomson's gazelles: some tests of the predictions

@article{Caro1986TheFO,
  title={The functions of stotting in Thomson's gazelles: some tests of the predictions},
  author={Tim Caro},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={1986},
  volume={34},
  pages={663-684}
}
  • T. Caro
  • Published 1 June 1986
  • Environmental Science
  • Animal Behaviour
Stotting in Thomson's gazelles: an honest signal of condition
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It is suggested that stotting could be an honest signal of a gazelle's ability to outrun predators, which coursers take into account when selecting prey.
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Perceptual advertisement by the prey of stalking or ambushing predators.
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The comparative behavior of two associated gazelles, Gazella granti and G. thomsonii was observed in Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania during a 2½-year antelope behavior study, and morphological differences alone may be considered adequate species-specific isolating mechanisms.
The functions of stotting: a review of the hypotheses
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  • Psychology
    Animal Behaviour
  • 1986
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Evidence is presented that the loud, repetitive, and highly directional qualities of calls could be properties to facilitate communicating the caller's alertness to potential predators rather than warning conspecifics, and that together with other components of the klipspringer's escape response, act as "pursuit deterrent" signals.
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It is argued that white undertail coverts have evolved in swamphens to provide contrast in color and location to the aggressive signal of the red shield and beak, which is important in a group living animal.
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Evolutionary studies suggest that behavioral as well as morphological characters are not maintained in a population unless they contribute to the longevity or reproductive proclivity of the possessing organism.
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