The function of zebra stripes.

@article{Caro2014TheFO,
  title={The function of zebra stripes.},
  author={Tim Caro and Amanda S. Izzo and Robert C. Reiner and Hannah Walker and Theodore Stankowich},
  journal={Nature communications},
  year={2014},
  volume={5},
  pages={
          3535
        }
}
Despite over a century of interest, the function of zebra stripes has never been examined systematically. Here we match variation in striping of equid species and subspecies to geographic range overlap of environmental variables in multifactor models controlling for phylogeny to simultaneously test the five major explanations for this infamous colouration. For subspecies, there are significant associations between our proxy for tabanid biting fly annoyance and most striping measures (facial and… 

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