The function of hatching asynchrony in the blue-footed booby

@article{Osorno2004TheFO,
  title={The function of hatching asynchrony in the blue-footed booby},
  author={Jos{\'e} Luis Osorno and Hugh Drummond},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
  year={2004},
  volume={37},
  pages={265-273}
}
The blue-footed booby (Sula nebouxii) commonly hatches two eggs 4 days apart; then the senior (first-hatched) chick aggressively dominates the other and sometimes kills it. Two hypotheses explaining the function of the hatching interval were tested by creating broods with synchronous hatching: the facultative brood reduction hypothesis of Lack (1954) and the sibling rivalry reduction hypothesis of Hahn (1981). The results contradicted most predictions of both hypotheses: synchronous broods… 
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