The function of dart shooting in helicid snails*

@inproceedings{Chase2007TheFO,
  title={The function of dart shooting in helicid snails*},
  author={Ronald Chase},
  year={2007}
}
  • R. Chase
  • Published 1 December 2007
  • Biology
Some stylommatophoran species, including several helicid snails common to Europe and North America, drive sharp, calcareous darts into their sexual partners prior to copulation. Why any animal would treat a prospective mate in this manner has been the subject of considerable speculation. One widely held belief is that the dart stimulates the partner. Here, I review evidence showing that this hypothesis, along with several others, is almost certainly incorrect. On the other hand, there is strong… Expand
The love-darts of land snails: integrating physiology, morphology and behaviour
TLDR
The reported physiological effects caused by the dart's mucus suggest a common function of the dart in increasing male reproductive success, but caution is needed when generalizing the use and effects of the love-dart, which are predominantly based on one model organism. Expand
Common effect of the mucus transferred during mating in two dart-shooting snail species from different families
TLDR
Experiments showed that in E. peliomphala, the dart mucus had a physiological effect and lowered the accessibility of the gametolytic organ, which indicates that in various dart-bearing species the mucus from the dart glands targets the same organ and that the inhibition of sperm digestion has played a crucial role in the evolution of the dart and its mucus. Expand
A literature database on the mating behavior of stylommatophoran land snails and slugs*
TLDR
This work reviews studies on the mating behavior of snails and slugs and creates a central access point and database for use as a resource by those interested in stylommatophoran mating behavior. Expand
Delayed spermatophore removal in the land snail Euhadra peliomphala
TLDR
Investigating the relationship between the length of the SPO in sperm donors and the position of their spermatophore in sperm recipients at 72, 84, and 96 h after mating showed that longer sperMatophores required longer times to reach a gametolytic organ and to begin to be digested, suggesting that this delay in sper matophore digestion explains the mechanism for the high fertilization success shown by snails with a long SPO. Expand
Mating behaviour, dart shape and spermatophore morphology of the Cuban tree snail Polymita picta (Born, 1780)
TLDR
The general mating pattern, the presence of the sensitive zone, repeated use of the dart and its shape diversity support the idea that in more ancestral dart-possessing snails the dart apparatus is used to transfer accessory gland secretions, not only by stabbing but also through wiping and rubbing. Expand
Effect of injection of love-dart mucus on physical vigour in land snails: can remating suppression be explained by physical damage?
TLDR
It is found that neither locomotion behaviour nor food consumption differed between snails artificially injected with the mucus and snails injected with a control solution. Expand
Differential survival of allosperm by location within the female storage organ of the snail Cornu aspersum
TLDR
The total number of sperm declined 66% over 8 weeks, with the largest losses incurred by sperm in the lumens of the tubules and sperm gathered in clusters, thus contradicting one proposed mechanism for cryptic female choice. Expand
Reproductive biology and mating conflict in the simultaneously hermaphroditic land snail Arianta arbustorum*
This review summarizes the present knowledge on the reproductive biology, mating system, sperm competition, sex allocation, and mating conflict in the simultaneously hermaphroditic land snail AriantaExpand
Cutaneous application of an accessory-gland secretion after sperm exchange in a terrestrial slug (Mollusca: Pulmonata).
TLDR
The results indicate the external application of a glandular substance that could function as either a pheromone or allohormone in hermaphroditic animals, and the behaviours of the recipients suggest sexual conflict, although mutual interest cannot be ruled out. Expand
The unlimited potential of the great pond snail, Lymnaea stagnalis
TLDR
This article aims to summarise the applicability of L. stagnalis and points out that this multipurpose model organism is an excellent, contemporary choice for addressing a large range of different biological questions, problems and phenomena. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 34 REFERENCES
Sex and darts in slugs and snails (Mollusca: Gastropoda: Stylommatophora)
TLDR
The results emphasize that to understand the use of darts, then data are required from a wide range of species, and the realization that several characters are correlated may stimulate further research, and could eventually lead to some testable models for dart and mating behaviour evolution. Expand
The snail's love-dart delivers mucus to increase paternity
TLDR
It is concluded that snails can optimize their reproductive success by mating with virgins and shooting their darts accurately, and support the hypothesis that the dart transfers a substance capable of reconfiguring the spermatophore-receiving organs. Expand
Dart shooting influences paternal reproductive success in the snail Helix aspersa (Pulmonata, Stylommatophora)
TLDR
It is indicated that snails that shoot darts effectively have significantly greater paternal reproductive success than snailed that shoot poorly, and dart shooting is unlikely to function as a stimulus for copulation. Expand
Determinants of paternity in the garden snail Helix aspersa
TLDR
A novel mechanism is proposed to explain the detected pattern of sperm utilization in helicid snails, which was more pronounced in the clutches of smaller recipients when the recipient was hit by the penultimate donor. Expand
Dart shooting in helicid snails: An 'honest' signal or an instrument of manipulation?
TLDR
An alternative hypothesis is suggested, namely, that snails have evolved dartshooting behaviour in order to manipulate sperm utilization and/or oviposition in their mating partners (Charnov, 1979; Tompa, 1980). Expand
Dart receipt promotes sperm storage in the garden snail Helix aspersa
TLDR
Testing the effect of dart receipt on the number of sperm stored by once-mated snails, Helix aspersa, suggests a role for dart-shooting in post-copulatory sexual selection. Expand
On the adaptive function of the love dart of Helix aspersa
TLDR
Data on the sexual behavior of Helix aspersa and H. pomatia compiled from previous accounts, supplemented with new observations, do not support the traditional hypotheses that the dart serves reproductive isolation or behavioral stimulation/coordination functions. Expand
Independence, not conflict, characterizes dart-shooting and sperm exchange in a hermaphroditic snail
TLDR
Mating in C. aspersus is a partnership in which independent actors demonstrate unconditional reciprocity during courtship and sperm transfer, and every snail transfers sperm to its partner, and the size of the donation does not depend on the success or failure of either snail's dart shot. Expand
THE LOVE DART OF HELIX ASPERSA MULLER IS NOT A GIFT OF CALCIUM
TLDR
It is concluded that the love dart of Helix aspersa is not a gift of calcium, but instead it is a vehicle to introduce a substance into the partner to influence the fate of the donated sperm. Expand
Changes in the reproductive system of the snail Helix aspersa caused by mucus from the love dart.
The function of the love dart in certain species of terrestrial snails is unknown. In Helix aspersa, the dart is a sharp calcareous structure that is used to pierce the partner's skin duringExpand
...
1
2
3
4
...