The frontline of avian brood parasite–host coevolution

@article{Feeney2012TheFO,
  title={The frontline of avian brood parasite–host coevolution},
  author={William E. Feeney and Justin A. Welbergen and Naomi E. Langmore},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={2012},
  volume={84},
  pages={3-12}
}
Advances in the Study of Coevolution Between Avian Brood Parasites and Their Hosts
TLDR
The evolution and phylogenetic history of avian brood parasitism is discussed, and coevolved adaptations and counteradaptations in brood parasites and hosts at all stages of the host nesting cycle are examined.
Macroevolutionary outcomes of coevolution between avian brood parasites and their hosts
TLDR
This thesis explores the effects of brood parasitism on macroevolutionary patterns in both hosts and parasites and investigates why one type of defence, egg rejection, evolves in some host species and not in others.
The overlooked complexity of avian brood parasite-host relationships.
TLDR
It is found that complex brood parasite-host systems, where multiple species of brood parasites and hosts coexist and interact, are globally commonplace and the stark mismatch between past research efforts and global patterns of network complexity is highlighted.
Brood Parasitism in Birds: A Coevolutionary Point of View
TLDR
The traditional model of coevolution between brood parasites and their hosts is presented, but it is also incorporated to incorporate new discoveries reported during the last two decades, which, frequently, do not support important predictions ofCoevolutionary theory.
Long‐term coevolution between avian brood parasites and their hosts
  • M. Soler
  • Biology
    Biological reviews of the Cambridge Philosophical Society
  • 2014
TLDR
A model suggests that as an increasing number of species acquire successful resistance, other unparasitized host species become more profitable and their parasitism rate and the costs imposed by brood parasitism at the population level will increase, selecting for the evolution of host defences.
Coevolutionary arms race between a specialist brood parasite, the Screaming Cowbird, and its host, the Grayish Baywing
TLDR
The main results of a long-term study on the costs of Screaming Cowbird parasitism on the Grayish Baywing’s reproductive success are summarized and how these costs have favored reciprocal adaptations and counter-adaptations at each stage of the nesting cycle.
Coevolution of acoustical communication between obligate avian brood parasites and their hosts
TLDR
A meta-analysis suggested that studies of acoustic communication and transmission in adult hosts were highly heterogenous, suggesting that research methods were inconsistent among studies, and identified knowledge gaps and proposed several lines of future research.
Obligate Brood Parasitism on Neotropical Birds
TLDR
A compendium of the characteristics and behaviors of brood-parasitic species that can help understanding on how natural selection can shape the interactions between species is presented.
Colour, vision and coevolution in avian brood parasitism
  • M. Stoddard, M. Hauber
  • Biology
    Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
  • 2017
TLDR
Vision-based adaptations that arise in parasite–host interactions are reviewed, emphasizing that these adaptations can be visual/sensory, cognitive or phenotypic in nature and highlighting recent breakthroughs in chemistry, genomics, neuroscience and computer vision.
From micro- to macroevolution: brood parasitism as a driver of phenotypic diversity in birds
TLDR
This review uses the coevolution between brood parasites and their hosts to illustrate the potential of behavioral interactions to drive evolution of phenotypic diversity at different taxonomic scales and provides a bridge between behavioral ecology and macroevolution.
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