The free-radical hypothesis of aging goes prokaryotic

@article{Nystrm2003TheFH,
  title={The free-radical hypothesis of aging goes prokaryotic},
  author={T. Nystr{\"o}m},
  journal={Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences CMLS},
  year={2003},
  volume={60},
  pages={1333-1341}
}
  • T. Nyström
  • Published 2003
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences CMLS
AbstractWith respect to oxidative damage and its targets, growth-arrested bacterial cells show some of the same signs of senescence as aging insects, worms and mammals. In addition, the fact that the life span of growth-arrested Escherichia coli cells is greatly extended by limiting oxygen availability suggests that free radicals may be one causal factor behind bacterial senescence. Recent analysis reveals a novel culprit in this oxidation, namely the production of aberrant proteins, which… Expand
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