The free‐radical damage theory: Accumulating evidence against a simple link of oxidative stress to ageing and lifespan

@article{Speakman2011TheFD,
  title={The free‐radical damage theory: Accumulating evidence against a simple link of oxidative stress to ageing and lifespan},
  author={John R. Speakman and Colin Selman},
  journal={BioEssays},
  year={2011},
  volume={33}
}
Recent work on a small European cave salamander (Proteus anguinus) has revealed that it has exceptional longevity, yet it appears to have unexceptional defences against oxidative damage. This paper comes at the end of a string of other studies that are calling into question the free‐radical damage theory of ageing. This theory rose to prominence in the 1990s as the dominant theory for why we age and die. Despite substantial correlative evidence to support it, studies in the last five years have… 
Antioxidant Vitamins and Ageing.
TLDR
The inability of antioxidant supplementation to improve health and longevity is discussed and the antioxidants' beneficial role may be reversed/prevented by excessive amounts of antioxidant supplements.
The free radical theory of aging is dead. Long live the damage theory!
  • V. Gladyshev
  • Biology, Medicine
    Antioxidants & redox signaling
  • 2014
TLDR
It is discussed that infidelity, heterogeneity, and imperfectness of each and every biological process may be responsible for the inevitable accumulation of by-products and other damage forms and biological imperfectness may help define the true root of aging.
OXIDATIVE STRESS AND THE EVOLUTION OF SEX DIFFERENCES IN LIFE SPAN AND AGEING IN THE DECORATED CRICKET, GRYLLODES SIGILLATUS
TLDR
In females, it is found that elevated fecundity early in life is associated with greater protein oxidation later in life, which is in turn positively correlated with the rate of ageing, which provides mixed support for the FRTA.
The free‐radical theory of ageing – older, wiser and still alive
  • T. Kirkwood, A. Kowald
  • Biology, Medicine
    BioEssays : news and reviews in molecular, cellular and developmental biology
  • 2012
TLDR
There is a need to look more closely at the mechanisms by which free radicals contribute to age‐related dysfunction in living systems and the expectation that free‐radical damage on its own might cause ageing needs to be relinquished.
The Greenland shark: A new challenge for the oxidative stress theory of ageing?
Deleterious consequences of antioxidant supplementation on lifespan in a wild-derived mammal
TLDR
Surprisingly, antioxidant supplementation significantly shortened lifespan in voles maintained under both cold and warm conditions, further question the predictions of free-radical theory of ageing and indicate that similar levels of antioxidants can induce widely different interspecific effects on lifespan.
Inflammatory challenge increases measures of oxidative stress in a free-ranging, long-lived mammal
TLDR
It is concluded that in a long-lived mammal, even high concentrations of antioxidants do not immediately neutralise free radicals produced during a cellular immune response, suggesting that fighting an infection may lead to oxidative stress in bats.
Oxidative stress as a cost of reproduction: Beyond the simplistic trade‐off model
  • J. Speakman, M. Garratt
  • Biology, Medicine
    BioEssays : news and reviews in molecular, cellular and developmental biology
  • 2014
TLDR
The background to the oxidative stress hypothesis is explored, some of the complexities in testing it are highlighted, and it is concluded that the approach recently suggested to be least useful in this context (comparing reproducing to non‐reproducing animals) may in fact be the most powerful.
The redox stress hypothesis of aging.
Oxidative stress and life histories: unresolved issues and current needs
TLDR
Developments in this field of life histories are outlined and a number of important unresolved issues that may guide future research efforts are summarized.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 74 REFERENCES
Is the oxidative stress theory of aging dead?
The oxidative stress theory of aging: embattled or invincible? Insights from non-traditional model organisms
Reactive oxygen species (ROS), inevitable byproducts of aerobic metabolism, are known to cause oxidative damage to cells and molecules. This, in turn, is widely accepted as a pivotal determinant of
Trends in oxidative aging theories.
Against the oxidative damage theory of aging: superoxide dismutases protect against oxidative stress but have little or no effect on life span in Caenorhabditis elegans.
TLDR
Findings imply that O(2)(-) is not a major determinant of aging in Caenorhabditis elegans, suggesting a signaling role for sod-4.
Minireview: the role of oxidative stress in relation to caloric restriction and longevity.
TLDR
Recent reports of caloric restriction and longevity are reviewed, focusing on mitochondrial oxidative stress and the proposed mechanisms leading to an extended longevity in calorie-restricted animals.
Oxidative stress as a mediator of life history trade-offs: mechanisms, measurements and interpretation.
TLDR
The potential role of oxidative stress in mediating life-history trade-offs is critically reviewed, a framework for formulating appropriate hypotheses and guiding experimental design is presented, and potentially fruitful areas for further research are indicated.
High oxidative damage levels in the longest‐living rodent, the naked mole‐rat
TLDR
The findings strongly suggest that mechanisms other than attenuated oxidative stress explain the impressive longevity of the naked mole‐rat and that NMRs live an order of magnitude longer than predicted based on their body size.
The Effect of Long‐term Dietary Supplementation with Antioxidants a
TLDR
It is reported that long‐term supplementation with vitamin E enhances immune function in aged animals and elderly subjects and that the beneficial effect of vitamin E in the reduction of risk of atherosclerosis is, in part, associated with molecular modulation of the interaction of immune and endothelial cells.
Oxidative stress and mitochondrial function with aging – the effects of calorie restriction
  • B. Merry
  • Biology, Medicine
    Aging cell
  • 2004
TLDR
It has been proposed that CR feeding slows the rate of accrual of oxidative damage because mitochondria in these animals have a lower rate of superoxide generation when compared with mitochondria from control animals.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...