The fractal nature of maps and mapping

@article{Jiang2015TheFN,
  title={The fractal nature of maps and mapping},
  author={Bin Jiang},
  journal={International Journal of Geographical Information Science},
  year={2015},
  volume={29},
  pages={159 - 174}
}
  • B. Jiang
  • Published 14 June 2014
  • Physics
  • International Journal of Geographical Information Science
A fractal can be simply understood as a set or pattern in which there are far more small things than large ones, for example, far more small geographic features than large ones on the earth surface, or far more large-scale maps than small-scale maps for a geographic region. This article attempts to argue and provide evidence for the fractal nature of maps and mapping. It is the underlying fractal structure of geographic features, either natural or man-made, that make reality mappable, large… 

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