The fourth level of social structure in a multi‐level society: ecological and social functions of clans in hamadryas baboons

@article{Schreier2009TheFL,
  title={The fourth level of social structure in a multi‐level society: ecological and social functions of clans in hamadryas baboons},
  author={Amy L. Schreier and Larissa Swedell},
  journal={American Journal of Primatology},
  year={2009},
  volume={71}
}
Hamadryas baboons are known for their complex, multi‐level social structure consisting of troops, bands, and one‐male units (OMUs) [Kummer, 1968. Social organization of hamadryas baboons. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press. 189p]. Abegglen [1984. On socialization in hamadryas baboons: a field study. Lewisburg, PA: Bucknell University Press. 207p.] observed a fourth level of social structure comprising several OMUs that rested near one another on sleeping cliffs, traveled most closely… 
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