The fossil record of North American mammals: evidence for a Paleocene evolutionary radiation.

@article{Alroy1999TheFR,
  title={The fossil record of North American mammals: evidence for a Paleocene evolutionary radiation.},
  author={John Alroy},
  journal={Systematic biology},
  year={1999},
  volume={48 1},
  pages={
          107-18
        }
}
  • J. Alroy
  • Published 1 March 1999
  • Geography, Environmental Science
  • Systematic biology
Paleontologists long have argued that the most important evolutionary radiation of mammals occurred during the early Cenozoic, if not that all eutherians originated from a single common post-Cretaceous ancestor. Nonetheless, several recent molecular analyses claim to show that because several interordinal splits occurred during the Cretaceous, a major therian radiation was then underway. This claim conflicts with statistical evidence from the well-sampled latest Cretaceous and Cenozoic North… 
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