The formation of hyponitrous acid as an intermediate compound in the biological or photochemical oxidation of ammonia to nitrous acid: Chemical reactions.

@article{Corbet1934TheFO,
  title={The formation of hyponitrous acid as an intermediate compound in the biological or photochemical oxidation of ammonia to nitrous acid: Chemical reactions.},
  author={Alexander Steven Corbet},
  journal={The Biochemical journal},
  year={1934},
  volume={28 4},
  pages={
          1575-82
        }
}
  • A. Corbet
  • Published 1934
  • Chemistry
  • The Biochemical journal

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    Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom
  • 1937
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