The foot of Homo naledi

@article{HarcourtSmith2015TheFO,
  title={The foot of Homo naledi},
  author={William E. H. Harcourt‐Smith and Zachary Throckmorton and Kimberly A. Congdon and Bernhard Zipfel and Andrew S. Deane and Michelle S.M. Drapeau and Steven Emilio Churchill and Lee R. Berger and Jeremy M. DeSilva},
  journal={Nature Communications},
  year={2015},
  volume={6}
}
Modern humans are characterized by a highly specialized foot that reflects our obligate bipedalism. Our understanding of hominin foot evolution is, although, hindered by a paucity of well-associated remains. Here we describe the foot of Homo naledi from Dinaledi Chamber, South Africa, using 107 pedal elements, including one nearly-complete adult foot. The H. naledi foot is predominantly modern human-like in morphology and inferred function, with an adducted hallux, an elongated tarsus, and… 

One small step: A review of Plio-Pleistocene hominin foot evolution.

This review document anatomical differences between extant ape and human foot bones, and comprehensively examine the hominin foot fossil record, and finds strong evidence for mosaic evolution of the foot, and a variety of anatomically and functionally distinct foot forms as bipedal locomotion evolved.

The hand of Homo naledi

The finger bones are longer and more curved than in most australopiths, indicating frequent use of the hand during life for strong grasping during locomotor climbing and suspension, and are considered adaptive for intensified manual manipulation.

Homo naledi, a new species of the genus Homo from the Dinaledi Chamber, South Africa

Homo naledi is a previously-unknown species of extinct hominin discovered within the Dinaledi Chamber of the Rising Star cave system, Cradle of Humankind, South Africa. This species is characterized

The upper limb of Homo naledi.

The vertebrae and ribs of Homo naledi.

Morphometric analysis of the hominin talus: Evolutionary and functional implications.

Evolution and function of the hominin forefoot

A consistent and generalizable pattern in hominin pedal evolution that spans from Ardipithecus to early Homo is indicated, highlighting the mosaic nature of pedal evolution and the emergence of a derived, modern hallux relatively late in human evolution.

Early hominin diversity and the emergence of the genus Homo.

  • W. Harcourt‐Smith
  • Biology
    Journal of anthropological sciences = Rivista di antropologia : JASS
  • 2016
It is now apparent that there was even more locomotor diversity and experimentation across hominins than previously thought, and with the discovery of taxa such as H. floresiensis and H. naledi, that diversity continues well into the genus Homo.

Homo naledi pelvic remains from the Dinaledi Chamber, South Africa.

The evolution of the human foot

Here, a review of the current understanding of the evolutionary history of the hominin foot is provided, inviting a reassessment of how the human foot evolved, and providing fresh new evidence for locomotor diversity throughout hom inin evolution.
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 48 REFERENCES

The hand of Homo naledi

The finger bones are longer and more curved than in most australopiths, indicating frequent use of the hand during life for strong grasping during locomotor climbing and suspension, and are considered adaptive for intensified manual manipulation.

The foot of Homo floresiensis

It is shown that LB1’s foot is exceptionally long relative to the femur and tibia, proportions never before documented in hominins but seen in some African apes, raising the possibility that the ancestor of H. floresiensis was not Homo erectus but instead some other, more primitive, hominin whose dispersal into southeast Asia is still undocumented.

Homo naledi, a new species of the genus Homo from the Dinaledi Chamber, South Africa

Homo naledi is a previously-unknown species of extinct hominin discovered within the Dinaledi Chamber of the Rising Star cave system, Cradle of Humankind, South Africa. This species is characterized

Combining Prehension and Propulsion: The Foot of Ardipithecus ramidus

The last common ancestor of hominids and chimpanzees was therefore a careful climber that retained adaptations to above-branch plantigrady and would thus have been unique among known primates.

Fossils, feet and the evolution of human bipedal locomotion

The varying interpretations based on this material are discussed and assessed in the context of new three‐dimensional morphometric analyses of australopithecine and Homo foot bones, suggesting that there may have been greater diversity in human bipedalism in the earlier phases of the authors' evolutionary history than previously suspected.

Foot bones from Omo: implications for hominid evolution.

  • D. GeboG. Schwartz
  • Geography, Environmental Science
    American journal of physical anthropology
  • 2006
Although the Omo tarsals are a million years younger than the oldest known foot bones from Hadar, both localities demonstrate anatomical differences representing two distinct morphological patterns, suggesting that biomechanical changes did occur over time, and that certain features are associated with different hominid lineages.

A new hominin foot from Ethiopia shows multiple Pliocene bipedal adaptations

New pedal elements from a newly discovered partial hominin foot skeleton from eastern Africa show that new pedal elements belong to a species that does not match the contemporaneous Australopithecus afarensis in its morphology and inferred locomotor adaptations, but instead is more similar to the earlier Ardipithecus ramidus in possessing an opposable great toe.

Talocrural joint in African hominoids: implications for Australopithecus afarensis.

Comparisons between the hominids and African pongids clearly illustrate the anatomical and mechanical changes that occurred in this joint as a consequence of the evolutionary transition to habitual bipedality.

Functional morphology of the ankle and the likelihood of climbing in early hominins

  • J. DeSilva
  • Biology, Psychology
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
  • 2009
This study finds that chimpanzees engage in an extraordinary range of foot dorsiflexion and inversion during vertical climbing bouts, and concludes that if hominins included tree climbing as part of their locomotor repertoire, then they were performing this activity in a manner decidedly unlike modern chimpanzees.