The flight paths of honeybees recruited by the waggle dance

@article{Riley2005TheFP,
  title={The flight paths of honeybees recruited by the waggle dance},
  author={Joseph R. Riley and Uwe Greggers and A. D. Smith and Don R. Reynolds and R. Menzel},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2005},
  volume={435},
  pages={205-207}
}
In the ‘dance language’ of honeybees, the dancer generates a specific, coded message that describes the direction and distance from the hive of a new food source, and this message is displaced in both space and time from the dancer's discovery of that source. Karl von Frisch concluded that bees ‘recruited’ by this dance used the information encoded in it to guide them directly to the remote food source, and this Nobel Prize-winning discovery revealed the most sophisticated example of non… 

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The waggle dance of the honey bee is one of the most extensively studied forms of animal communication, but only recently have investigators closely examined its adaptive significance, that is, how
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