The flight of Archaeopteryx

@article{Chatterjee2003TheFO,
  title={The flight of Archaeopteryx},
  author={Sankar Chatterjee and R. Jack Templin},
  journal={Naturwissenschaften},
  year={2003},
  volume={90},
  pages={27-32}
}
The origin of avian flight is often equated with the phylogeny, ecology, and flying ability of the primitive Jurassic bird, Archaeopteryx. Debate persists about whether it was a terrestrial cursor or a tree dweller. Despite broad acceptance of its arboreal life style from anatomical, phylogenetic, and ecological evidence, a new version of the cursorial model was proposed recently asserting that a running Archaeopteryx could take off from the ground using thrust and sustain flight in the air… Expand

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