The first hominin fleet

@article{Westaway2019TheFH,
  title={The first hominin fleet},
  author={Michael C. Westaway},
  journal={Nature Ecology \& Evolution},
  year={2019},
  volume={3},
  pages={999-1000}
}
New research suggests that groups of ~130 modern humans at minimum undertook planned expeditions to colonise Sahul via a northern route. However, the necessity of more evidence to test this model reflects a need for change in the way we investigate the population history of this region. 
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