The first Cretaceous bird from Madagascar

@article{Forster1996TheFC,
  title={The first Cretaceous bird from Madagascar},
  author={Catherine A. Forster and Luis Mar{\'i}a Chiappe and David W. Krause and Scott D. Sampson},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1996},
  volume={382},
  pages={532-534}
}
WE report the discovery of two exquisitely preserved specimens of a new, very primitive bird from the Late Cretaceous period of Madagascar. The new taxon, Vorona berivotrensis, is provisionally placed phylogenetically in an unresolved trichotomy with Enantiornithes and a clade consisting of Patagopteryx and Ornithurae. These specimens are the first known pre-Holocene birds from Madagascar and the first avian skeletal remains from the Mesozoic era of a large portion of Gondwana. 
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