The fate of morphological complexity in language death: Evidence from East Sutherland Gaelic

@article{Dorian1978TheFO,
  title={The fate of morphological complexity in language death: Evidence from East Sutherland Gaelic},
  author={Nancy C. Dorian},
  journal={Language},
  year={1978},
  volume={54},
  pages={590 - 609}
}
Simplification in structure, and also confluence between the local-language structure and the prestige-language structure, are usually predicted in language death as in pidginization. For a dying Scottish Gaelic dialect, speakers representing a broad proficiency continuum were tested in the two most excessively complex morphological structures the dialect offers, the noun plural and the gerund. The forms supplied by the semi-speakers at the bottom of the proficiency continuum show considerable… Expand
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