The fall migration flyways of monarch butterflies in eastern North America revealed by citizen scientists

@article{Howard2008TheFM,
  title={The fall migration flyways of monarch butterflies in eastern North America revealed by citizen scientists},
  author={Elizabeth A. Howard and Andrew K. Davis},
  journal={Journal of Insect Conservation},
  year={2008},
  volume={13},
  pages={279-286}
}
The migration of monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) from Canada and the United States to overwintering sites in Mexico is one of the world’s most amazing biological phenomena, although recent threats make it imperative that the resources needed by migrating monarchs be conserved. The most important first step in preserving migration resources—determining the migration flyways—is also the most challenging because of the large-scale nature of the migration. Prior attempts to determine the… 

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...

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