The facial expression musculature in primates and its evolutionary significance

@article{Burrows2008TheFE,
  title={The facial expression musculature in primates and its evolutionary significance},
  author={Anne M. Burrows},
  journal={BioEssays},
  year={2008},
  volume={30}
}
  • A. Burrows
  • Published 1 March 2008
  • Biology, Psychology
  • BioEssays
Facial expression is a mode of close‐proximity non‐vocal communication used by primates and is produced by mimetic/facial musculature. Arguably, primates make the most‐intricate facial displays and have some of the most‐complex facial musculature of all mammals. Most of the earlier ideas of primate mimetic musculature, involving its function in facial displays and its evolution, were essentially linear “scala natural” models of increasing complexity. More‐recent work has challenged these ideas… 
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