The eyes of hyperiid amphipods: relations of optical structure to depth

@article{Land2004TheEO,
  title={The eyes of hyperiid amphipods: relations of optical structure to depth},
  author={M. Land},
  journal={Journal of Comparative Physiology A},
  year={2004},
  volume={164},
  pages={751-762}
}
  • M. Land
  • Published 2004
  • Physics
  • Journal of Comparative Physiology A
SummaryIn many oceanic hyperiid amphipods the eyes are double structures, with a specialized upward-pointing region covering a narrow field of view. Inter-ommatidial angles were measured across the eyes of 10 species from different depth ranges. With increasing depth (decreasing light) there is a trend towards greater dorso-ventral asymmetry resulting in the separation of the two retinae and an increase in the size of the upper eye. The diameters (D) of the dorsal ommatidia increase with depth… Expand

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