The eyes have it: the neuroethology, function and evolution of social gaze

@article{Emery2000TheEH,
  title={The eyes have it: the neuroethology, function and evolution of social gaze},
  author={Nathan J. Emery},
  journal={Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews},
  year={2000},
  volume={24},
  pages={581-604}
}
Gaze is an important component of social interaction. The function, evolution and neurobiology of gaze processing are therefore of interest to a number of researchers. This review discusses the evolutionary role of social gaze in vertebrates (focusing on primates), and a hypothesis that this role has changed substantially for primates compared to other animals. This change may have been driven by morphological changes to the face and eyes of primates, limitations in the facial anatomy of other… CONTINUE READING

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