The exploitation of distributional information in syllable processing

@article{Perruchet2004TheEO,
  title={The exploitation of distributional information in syllable processing},
  author={Pierre Perruchet and Ronald Peereman},
  journal={Journal of Neurolinguistics},
  year={2004},
  volume={17},
  pages={97-119}
}

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The present chapter examines the role of distributional constraints in the acquisition of sub-syllabic language processing units and suggests that specific processing units such as the rime might emerge from the distributional properties of sequences of vowels and consonants.

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