The exclusion of high trauma fractures may underestimate the prevalence of bone fragility fractures in the community: the Geelong Osteoporosis Study.

@article{Sanders1998TheEO,
  title={The exclusion of high trauma fractures may underestimate the prevalence of bone fragility fractures in the community: the Geelong Osteoporosis Study.},
  author={Kerrie M Sanders and Julie A Pasco and Antony Marcello Ugoni and Geoffrey Charles Nicholson and E. R. BernsteinJeffrey I. Seeman and Tyler Martin and Billy Skoric and Shirin Panahi and Mark A Kotowicz},
  journal={Journal of bone and mineral research : the official journal of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research},
  year={1998},
  volume={13 8},
  pages={1337-42}
}
Fractures associated with severe trauma are generally excluded from estimates of the prevalence of osteoporotic fractures in the community. Because the degree of trauma is difficult to quantitate, low bone mass may contribute to fractures following severe trauma. We ascertained all fractures in a defined population and compared the bone mineral density (BMD) of women who sustained fractures in either "low" or "high" trauma events with the BMD of a random sample of women from the same population… CONTINUE READING

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