The evolutionary history of dogs in the Americas

@article{NLeathlobhair2018TheEH,
  title={The evolutionary history of dogs in the Americas},
  author={M{\'a}ire N{\'i} Leathlobhair and Angela R. Perri and Evan K. Irving-Pease and Kelsey E. Witt and Anna Linderholm and James Haile and Oph{\'e}lie Lebrasseur and Carly Ameen and Jeffrey P. Blick and Adam R. Boyko and Selina Brace and Yahaira Nunes Cortes and Susan J. Crockford and Alison M Devault and Evangelos A. Dimopoulos and Morley Eldridge and Jacob M. Enk and Shyam Gopalakrishnan and Kevin Gori and Vaughan Grimes and Eric J. Guiry and Anders Johannes Hansen and Ardern Hulme-Beaman and John R. Johnson and Andrew Kitchen and Aleksei K. Kasparov and Young Mi Kwon and Pavel A. Nikolskiy and Carlos Peraza Lope and Aur{\'e}lie Manin and Terrence J. Martin and Michael Meyer and Kelsey Noack Myers and Mark Omura and Jean-Marie Rouillard and Elena Yu Pavlova and Paul W. Sciulli and Mikkel‐Holger S. Sinding and Andrea Strakova and Varvara V. Ivanova and Chris Widga and Eske Willerslev and Vladimir V. Pitulko and Ian Barnes and M. Thomas P. Gilbert and Keith M. Dobney and Ripan Singh Malhi and Elizabeth P. Murchison and Greger Larson and Laurent Alain François Frantz},
  journal={Science},
  year={2018},
  volume={361},
  pages={81 - 85}
}
Lineage losses for man's best friend Dogs have been present in North America for at least 9000 years. To better understand how present-day breeds and populations reflect their introduction to the New World, Ní Leathlobhair et al. sequenced the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes of ancient dogs (see the Perspective by Goodman and Karlsson). The earliest New World dogs were not domesticated from North American wolves but likely originated from a Siberian ancestor. Furthermore, these lineages date… 
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