The evolution of the giant deer, Megaloceros giganteus (Blumenbach)

@article{Lister1994TheEO,
  title={The evolution of the giant deer, Megaloceros giganteus (Blumenbach)},
  author={Adrian M. Lister},
  journal={Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society},
  year={1994},
  volume={112},
  pages={65-100}
}
  • A. Lister
  • Published 1 September 1994
  • Environmental Science, Geography
  • Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society
Abstract The giant deer, Megaloceros giganteus , is best known from its fossil occurrences in Ireland around 11 000 years ago, but has a history across Europe and Western Asia spanning 300 000-400 000 years. This paper reports a biometric study of variation and evolution in the giant deer through its history. Most early populations were as large in body size as the Irish sample, but some were distinctly smaller and others had markedly shorter limbs. Thickened skull and mandibular bones… 
Skeleton of the giant deer Megaloceros giganteus giganteus (Blumenbach, 1803) (Mammalia, Artiodactyla) from the Irtysh Region near Pavlodar
An almost complete skeleton of the giant deer Megaloceros giganteus giganteus (Blumenbach, 1803) from the Dzhambul locality on the Irtysh River (Pavlodar Region, Kazakhstan) is described. About 80%
GIANT DEER Megaloceros giganteus ( CERVIDAE : MAMMALIA ) FROM LATE PLEISTOCENE OF MOLDOVA CROITOR ROMAN
The paper presents description of giant deer remains from Upper Paleolithic (Late Pleistocene) sites of Moldova. The comparison of size and proportions of dentition and lower mandibles revealed the
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Giant deer: Origin, evolution, role in the biosphere
TLDR
This monograph is devoted to the study of the giant deer or megacerines (tribe Megacerini, family Cervidae, order Artiodactyla) of the Late Cenozoic of Eurasia and certain basic principles of macroevolution and evolution of the biosphere are discussed.
Late Pleistocene remains of giant deer (Megaloceros giganteus Blumenbach) in Scandinavia: chronology and environment
This article presents new data on the Late Pleistocene giant deer, Megaloceros giganteus (Blumenbach), describing its distribution in time and space, geographical and sexual variation and general
Deer of the genus Megaloceros (Mammalia, Cervidae) from the Early Pleistocene of Ciscaucasia
A new deer species, Megaloceros stavropolensis sp. nov., from the pre-Apsheronian sandy–clayey deltaic deposits of the Georgievsk sand pit (village of Podgornoe, Stavropol Region) is described. The
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