The evolution of speech: a comparative review

@article{Fitch2000TheEO,
  title={The evolution of speech: a comparative review},
  author={W. Tecumseh Fitch},
  journal={Trends in Cognitive Sciences},
  year={2000},
  volume={4},
  pages={258-267}
}
  • W. Fitch
  • Published 2000
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Trends in Cognitive Sciences
The evolution of speech can be studied independently of the evolution of language, with the advantage that most aspects of speech acoustics, physiology and neural control are shared with animals, and thus open to empirical investigation. At least two changes were necessary prerequisites for modern human speech abilities: (1) modification of vocal tract morphology, and (2) development of vocal imitative ability. Despite an extensive literature, attempts to pinpoint the timing of these changes… Expand
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