The evolution of speech: a comparative review

@article{Fitch2000TheEO,
  title={The evolution of speech: a comparative review},
  author={W. Tecumseh Fitch},
  journal={Trends in Cognitive Sciences},
  year={2000},
  volume={4},
  pages={258-267}
}
  • W. Fitch
  • Published 1 July 2000
  • Biology, Psychology
  • Trends in Cognitive Sciences

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