The evolution of parental care in fishes, with reference to Darwin's rule of male sexual selection

@article{Baylis2004TheEO,
  title={The evolution of parental care in fishes, with reference to Darwin's rule of male sexual selection},
  author={Jeffrey R. Baylis},
  journal={Environmental Biology of Fishes},
  year={2004},
  volume={6},
  pages={223-251}
}
  • J. Baylis
  • Published 1 May 1981
  • Biology
  • Environmental Biology of Fishes
SynopsisA simple two part hypothesis is proposed to describe the sources of selection influencing the evolution of parental care in fishes. It is derived in part from the observation that most fishes exhibiting complex patterns of parental behavior are freshwater forms. The first aspect of the hypothesis assumes that differential zygote mortality occurs in spatially and temporally varying environments. The second assumes that rates of gametogenesis are faster in males than in females. These… 

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