The evolution of non-relictual tropical troglobites

@article{Howarth1987TheEO,
  title={The evolution of non-relictual tropical troglobites},
  author={F. Howarth},
  journal={International Journal of Speleology},
  year={1987},
  volume={16},
  pages={1-16}
}
  • F. Howarth
  • Published 1987
  • Biology
  • International Journal of Speleology
The discovery of terrestrial troglobites living in caves on young oceanic islands with closcl epigean relatives living in nearby surface habitats offers unique opportunities to develop and tclSthypotheses concerning their evolution. Studies comparing the physiological ecology of troglobites with their epigean relatives suggest that troglobites arcl highly specialized to exploit resources within the system of interconnected medium-sized voids (mesocaverns) and only colonize cave passages… Expand

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