The evolution of modern human behavior in East Asia: Current perspectives

@article{Norton2009TheEO,
  title={The evolution of modern human behavior in East Asia: Current perspectives},
  author={Christopher J. Norton and Jennie J.H. Jin},
  journal={Evolutionary Anthropology: Issues},
  year={2009},
  volume={18}
}
Behavioral modernity is considered one of the defining characteristics separating modern humans from earlier hominin lineages. Over the course of the past two decades, the nature and origins of modern human behavior have been among the most debated topics in paleoanthropology. 1–7 There are currently two primary competing hypotheses regarding how and when modern human behavior arose. The first one, which we shall term the saltational model, argues that between 50–40 kya modern human behavior… 
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  • Psychology
    Current Anthropology
  • 2011
Paleolithic archaeologists conceptualize the uniqueness of Homo sapiens in terms of “behavioral modernity,” a quality often conflated with behavioral variability. The former is qualitative,
Potential Contributions of Korean Pleistocene Hominin Fossils to Palaeoanthropology: A View from Ryonggok Cave
Traditionally, one of the primary problems hindering a better understanding of the “origin of modern humans” debate is the paucity of information coming out of eastern Asia. Here, we report a set of
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