The evolution of jumping in frogs: Morphological evidence for the basal anuran locomotor condition and the radiation of locomotor systems in crown group anurans

@article{Reilly2011TheEO,
  title={The evolution of jumping in frogs: Morphological evidence for the basal anuran locomotor condition and the radiation of locomotor systems in crown group anurans},
  author={S M Reilly and Michael E. Jorgensen},
  journal={Journal of Morphology},
  year={2011},
  volume={272}
}
Our understanding of the evolution of frog locomotion follows from the work of Emerson in which anurans are proposed to possess one of three different iliosacral configurations: 1) a lateral‐bending system found in walking and hopping frogs; 2) a fore‐aft sliding mechanism found in several locomotor modes; and 3) a sagittal‐hinge‐type pelvis posited to be related to long‐distance jumping performance. The most basal living (Ascaphus) and fossil (Prosalirus) frogs are described as sagittal‐hinge… 
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