The evolution of human speech: the role of enhanced breathing control.

@article{MacLarnon1999TheEO,
  title={The evolution of human speech: the role of enhanced breathing control.},
  author={Ann MacLarnon and Gwen Hewitt},
  journal={American journal of physical anthropology},
  year={1999},
  volume={109 3},
  pages={
          341-63
        }
}
Many cognitive and physical features must have undergone change for the evolution of fully modern human language. One neglected aspect is the evolution of increased breathing control. Evidence presented herein shows that modern humans and Neanderthals have an expanded thoracic vertebral canal compared with australopithecines and Homo ergaster, who had canals of the same relative size as extant nonhuman primates. Based on previously published analyses, these results demonstrate that there was an… Expand
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