The evolution of human reproduction: a primatological perspective.

@article{Martin2007TheEO,
  title={The evolution of human reproduction: a primatological perspective.},
  author={Robert Denis Martin},
  journal={American journal of physical anthropology},
  year={2007},
  volume={Suppl 45},
  pages={
          59-84
        }
}
  • R. Martin
  • Published 2007
  • Biology
  • American journal of physical anthropology
Successful reconstruction of any aspect of human evolution ideally requires broad-based comparisons with other primates, as recognition of general principles provides a more reliable foundation for inference. Indeed, in many cases it is necessary to conduct comparisons with other placental mammals to test interpretations. This review considers comparative evidence with respect to the following topics relating to human reproduction: (1) size of the testes, sperm, and baculum; (2) ovarian… 

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